The Top Pre-Fall 2019 Fashion Runways So Far


While everyone is more focused on the holidays this time of year, the fashion industry has its focus elsewhere. For those of you who keep up with fashion, you probably already know that those in the fashion industry are always ahead of the game and designer brands are already presenting their Pre-Fall 2019 collections on the runway. Here we’ve rounded up some of the top collections from our favourite designers in preparation for the upcoming year.

Coach 1941

In celebration of the brand’s 15th anniversary in China, the New York-based brand Coach debuted its Pre-Fall 2019 collection in Shanghai for the first time ever, which took place at the West Bund Art Center at Shanghai’s waterfront. With the show titled “Coach Lights Up Shanghai,” the upcoming collection brought back the early 1970’s rock and roll aesthetic for menswear and womenswear. Many pieces in the collection featured dark bold colours, floral vintage patterns, and even brought back the fur, leather and suede jackets that we all came to know and love from the ‘70s. The runway itself featured neon lights, stoplights and vintage cars that remind you of the urban edge of the city. The collection also featured collaborations with local contemporary Chinese creatives, including artists Zhu Jingyi, Yeti Out, Guang Yu, and Sui Jianguo. On the importance of why the runway was presented in Shanghai, Coach Creative Director Stuart Vevers says “Staging our Pre-Fall show in Shanghai is a big moment for Coach and for me personally. Shanghai is one of the most vibrant, youthful and contemporary cities I have ever visited.”

(Photos: Courtesy of Coach - On Vogue)

Alexander Wang

Labelled “COLLECTION 2,” designer Alexander Wang debuted his Pre-Fall 2019 collection in New York recently, which picks up from where his COLLECTION 1 left off. As COLLECTION 1 was an ode to his Chinese-American roots and his status as an immigrant, COLLECTION 2 follows by celebrating the American hustle. “We’re taking stereotypes of class and wealth and trying to remix them, giving status symbols a new sensibility,” Wang told Vogue. A variety of male and female models sported the “hustlers from the ‘80s” look, donning boxy blazers, bankers’ button downs, and garment bags slung over their shoulders. One of the items featured in the collection that stood out particularly was a large blazer that was encompassed with a large graffiti-style smiley face, a nod to the metropolitan street art in downtown cities."

(Photos: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni)

Versace

Taking place at the New York Stock Exchange Building, Donatella Versace threw her late brother Gianni Versace an extravagant birthday bash by unveiling Versace’s newest collection at their Pre-Fall 2019 show. As the Italian house’s first ever pre-collection runway show, Donatella Versace went all out by building a replica of Lady Liberty’s torch, which she said she saw the torch as “symbol of New York, but also a symbol of women, of empowerment and strength.” Many of the models sported bold and powerful looks, wearing items including vinyl overcoats, classic trench coats, leather knee-high boots, animal prints, mini skirts and tailored suits, all of which were complemented with Versace’s signature safety pins and gold buttons. Logo-encompassed luggage, giant duffle bags and puffer jackets were also seen on the runway, giving the SoHo vibe a more practical and youthful look.

(Photos: Courtesy of Alessandro Lucioni - On Vogue)

Valentino

Presenting their first-ever co-ed show, Valentino held their Pre-Fall 2019 runway show at the Terrada Warehouse in Tokyo this year. As many designer brands are branching out into the Asian market in the fashion industry, this is making Western fashion houses all the more powerful globally. “Since the very beginning, I wanted to catch a real connection between me and Japanese culture. Otherwise, there was no reason to show here,” says Valentino creative director Pierpaolo Piccioli. Many of the outfits included the fashion house’s signature ’80s red ruffles and tulle dresses, with the primary shade of red being used also representing cultural significance in Japan as the red graces the gates of its Shinto temples, the rising sun of its flag, and the kumadori stage makeup worn in its legendary kabuki theatres. Upon the layers of lace, tulle, ruffles, and pleats in bold red and black florals, the collection featured many romantic looks even amongst the menswear collection, showing Piccioli’s haute couture. The grand finale of the runway show ended with red rose petals descending from the roof above, making the show graceful and memorable for attendees.

(Photos: Courtesy of Filippo Fior - On Vogue)

Dior Homme

With the runway show taking place in Tokyo, Dior’s menswear artistic director Kim Jones honoured Christian Dior by incorporating Japanese culture with his vision, as Dior had always been in love with Japan and its culture. The collection featured a darker colour palette, with Dior grey, midnight blues and strong metallics, and gave off a more futuristic edgy look. Many of the models wore all sorts of different looks, going from the casual streetwear look in a bold metallic puffer jacket to looking dapper in monogram silk shirt with cherry blossom accents and posh asymmetrical blazer. To go along with the futuristic theme, Jones collaborated with Japanese illustrator Hajime Sorayama to create a 12-metre high aluminum robot sculpture to be placed in the centre of the catwalk, which definitely stole the show.

(Photos: Courtesy of Filippo Fior - On Vogue)


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